TRANSLATE THIS SITE

HOME  •  RECENT ISSUES  •  RESOURCES  •  NEWS  •  LINKS  •  SUBSCRIBE  •  ABOUT HAZARDS

PO BOX 199   SHEFFIELD   S1 4YL   ENGLAND         WWW.HAZARDS.ORG       

GET A LIFE!
Union tools to ensure your job doesn't take over your life.

Resources


To find out more
click here

TUC fortnightly Changing Times
e-bulletin
 
GET A LIFE! NEWS 2004 ARCHIVE

Britain: Putting the dead in deadlines
Setting tight work deadlines can raise the risk of a heart attack six-fold, researchers have found. The Karolinska Institute team found high demands, competition and conflict in the workplace were linked to heart attack risk.
Risks 187, 18 December 2004

Britain: Record sickness among demoralised civil servants
Stress and anxiety is causing record numbers of civil servants at the Department for Work and Pensions to go sick, a National Audit Office report has found. The highest rates of sickness were among staff who had the lowest paid, most stressful or repetitive jobs, often working in call centres, on benefit office counters or recording data; the lowest rates were among the top executives.

Risks 186, 11 December 2004

Britain: Tube workers ballot for action to head off dangerous hours
The biggest union on London Underground (LUL) is to ballot more than 330 signallers and line controllers for strike action. The move comes after six months of negotiations failed to resolve a four year dispute over a pay deal the company wants to link to job cuts, longer shifts and fewer breaks.

Risks 186, 11 December 2004

Britain: February 25 is 'work your proper hours' day in 2005
Here's one for your diary. Friday, February 25 is the day in 2005 when the TUC estimates that people who do unpaid overtime will stop working for free and start to get paid.
Risks 186, 11 December 2004

Global: Work stress can leave you demented
New research shows that workers with better jobs with a lot of control run a lower risk of developing dementia. The Occupational and Environmental Medicine paper comes on the heels of a US study that found mind-numbing jobs were linked to a higher rate of Alzheimer's.
Risks 184, 27 November 2004

China: Overwork kills another factory worker
A female worker has died of suspected overwork in a garment factory. The death is the latest in a series that have been linked to overwork.
Risks 183, 20 November 2004

Britain: You are not mad - it was the job that did it
The largest ever review of the link between work stress and strain injuries has shown that physical and mental stress is hurting us, and employers aren't do enough to let workers take proper control over their jobs.
Risks 183, 20 November 2004

Canada: Burned out workers costing billions
The downsizing that swept Canada's workplaces during the 1980s and 1990s backfired, with so much work piled on surviving employees that they and the health care system are suffering.
Risks 182, 13 November 2004

Britain: Cool welcome for stress management standards
Unions have given a qualified welcome to new Health and Safety Executive (HSE) stress management standards, warning that the safety watchdog must be ready to take enforcement action if firms fail to act.
Risks 181, 6 November 2004

Britain: TGWU "furious" over haulage work hours move
Drivers and transport workers have been badly let down by the government and the transport industry and could miss out on the full protection supposed to come from the Working Time Directive, according to transport union TGWU.
Risks 181, 6 November 2004

Britain: Workers "are more stressed than ever"
Three in every five workers (58 per cent) now complain of being stressed at work, an increase of two per cent from 2002, according to latest TUC figures. TUC found the main causes of stress identified by safety reps are increased workloads, change at work, staff cuts, long hours and bullying.
Risks 181, 6 November 2004

Europe: Unions and employers agree workplace stress framework
Organisations representing unions and employers across Europe have signed a framework agreement aimed at tackling workplace stress.
Risks 178, 16 October 2004

USA: Dangers in the night
Workplace accidents that result in injuries are much more likely to occur at night than in daytime hours, studies suggest. Kenneth N Fortson, writing in the Monthly Labor Review, says data from Texas workers' compensation claims shows the injury rate is higher late at night than during the regular 9-5 shift.
Risks 178, 16 October 2004

Denmark: Better work can reduce heart attacks
Improving the quality of a person's job can reduce their risk of a heart attack, new research has shown. Medical and workplace health researchers from Denmark found the benefits would be most pronounced in unskilled workers and added: "Improvements in psychosocial work environment, especially possibility for skill development, could contribute to a reduction in the incidence of MI and in social inequality in MI."
Risks 178, 16 October 2004

Britain: TGWU puts bus operators on hours warning
Bus drivers' union TGWU has urged members to step up the campaign to reduce driving hours. In a co-ordinated action, the union's sixty bus branches have put forward demands for a maximum continuous driving shift of four and a half hours and a maximum driving time of eight and a half hours in any one day.
Risks 178, 16 October 2004

Britain: Ho ho holidays all round for shopworkers
Friday 15 October has been hailed as an historic milestone in shopworkers' union Usdaw's long running campaign to ensure large stores cannot open on 25 December. The Christmas Day (Trading) Bill, sponsored by Labour MP Kevan Jones, has passed its final Commons stage in time for this year's festive period.
Risks 178, 16 October 2004

Britain: Government "muddled and naïve" on working time
The government is denying "substantial evidence" of the health effects of long hours and is giving a "muddled and naïve" message on working time, says top thinktank The Work Foundation.
Risks 177, 9 October 2004

Britain
Too little sleep is not working

A new report says British adults now get an average of 90 minutes less than they used to. Lack of sleep is leading to problems ranging from irritable behaviour and inefficiency at work, to ill-health, road accidents and even divorce, it says.
Risks 176, 2 October 2004

Britain
Working time fudge could leave workers stuffed

Amicus has said it is "dismayed at the confusing mess of proposals that the Commission has made in respect of modifications to the Working Time Directive." It says the proposal to increase the reference period for the calculation of maximum hours from 17 weeks to a year could leave some workers stuffed.
Risks 176, 2 October 2004

Japan
Easier worker-related suicide payouts planned
The Japanese authorities are to ease the workers' compensation qualification for work-related suicide, where employees kill themselves because of depression related to work. The Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry says there has been a sharp increase in "karojisatsu", work-related suicide.
Risks 175, 25 September 2004

Britain
Green alert on long hours
Flexible working is being used by UK employers to force employees to give up their rights and work the longest hours in Europe - widening the poverty gap and forcing thousands to suffer long-term ill-health, warns Flexible working: A work-life balance or a balancing, a Green Party report.
Risks 175, 25 September 2004

Britain
Changes to working time rules satisfy no-one
European Commission plans for the revision of the EU Working Time Directive would leave workers at risk of dangerously long working hours, the TUC has warned. Proposals published this week include the continuation of the opt-out for UK workers from the 48 hour working week ceiling.
Risks 175, 25 September 2004

Global
Long-term work stress is top heart attack risk
Stress is a cause of heart attacks, a major international study has confirmed. A report in The Lancet on 4 September found persistent severe stress makes it two and a half times more likely that an individual will have a heart attack compared with someone who is not stressed, with prolonged workplace stress the most dangerous risk factor.
Risks 173, 11 September 2004

Britain
Overwork crisis must be tackled
Family life is being damaged by long hours working, so the individual opt-out allowing parents to work over 48 hours a week must be abolished, says a report from the TUC and charity Working Families.
Risks 172, 4 September 2004

Canada
Stress is driving workers to tears
Burnout is literally driving public school and health care workers to tears, according to a union commissioned study. The Centrale des syndicats du Quebec backed study found about 40 per cent of respondents, most of whom were teachers, said they've cried on the job, mostly because they have too much work, or are too stressed out.
Risks 171, 28 August 2004

Britain
The time is right for a new bank holiday
The autumn half-term, the national saint's days of England, Scotland and Wales, and New Year's Eve are the most popular choices for the three new bank holidays sought by TUC, according to the results of an online vote on the TUC's world of work website.
Risks 171, 28 August 2004

Britain
Working all hours leads to all round problems
Many shop managers and supervisors, under pressure to meet targets and boost profit margins, regularly work excessive hours that put their health, safety and family lives at risk, says shopworkers' union Usdaw.
Risks 171, 28 August 2004

USA
Too much work, too little research
Americans work the longest hours in the developed world and are dropping like flies as a result.
Risks 170, 21 August 2004

Britain
Bullied workers suffer "battle stress"
A leading psychologist believes bullied workers go through the same emotions and stresses as battle-scarred troops.
Risks 170, 21 August 2004

Britain
Speak up now for stress controls
Your chance to have a say on Health and Safety Commission (HSC) proposals on work-related stress action has almost passed - so TUC is urging safety reps and unions to get their comments in soon.
Risks 170, 21 August 2004

Britain
Ambulance union victory on meal breaks
Unions representing ambulance staff in the north-east of England are claiming victory in a row over paid meal breaks.
Risks 170, 21 August 2004

USA
Mind-numbing jobs may up Alzheimer's risk
People who spent most of their lives in jobs that involve little brain work appear more likely to eventually develop Alzheimer's disease, according to new study.
Risks 169, 14 August 2004

Britain
"Frantic life syndrome" hits women workers
Working women in the UK think new technology makes their lives even more hectic, according to a new report. As a result, a growing number of career women are suffering from what has been dubbed "frantic life syndrome."
Risks 169, 14 August 2004

Britain
Unions hail workers' rights boost
Unions say they have won a "significant shift" in Labour policy on workers' rights and holidays.
Risks 167, 31 July 2004

Britain
Hours breakthrough for tug workers
Tug workers will have safer hours with more humane rest periods under an agreement struck by transport union TGWU.
Risks 166, 24 July 2004

Britain
Quickie lunches are dangerous, says TUC
Workers' health and productivity is being jeopardised as lunch breaks get squeezed so they are now the shortest ever.
Risks 166, 24 July 2004

Europe
EC must speed up working time reforms
Europe's trade unions are urging the European Commission to act now to ensure workers get the protection they are supposed to receive from the 1993 Working Time Directive. Top European trade union body ETUC says it is disappointed the EC has failed to ensure workers get their working time safety rights and says it "regrets" the intransigence of Europe's employers.
Risks 165, 17 July 2004

Britain
Deadly work stress effects revealed
Stress and insecurity at work can make you sick or even kill you - and is more the lower you are down the pecking order, the more likely it is to get you.
Risks 164, 11 July 2004

Britain
Amicus bullying pilot takes off
Amicus is to call on employers at Heathrow and Gatwick to combat the growing problem of bullying and harassment within the airline industry.
Risks 164, 11 July 2004

Britain
Masterclasses aim to stop long hours
The TUC has welcomed a series of government "masterclasses" advising firms how to address Britain's long hours culture.
Risks 164, 11 July 2004

Britain
Stress-related sickness up
A majority of employers have noticed an increase in stress-related absence during the past twelve months, according to new research. Unions say this shows employees are feeling obliged to push themselves too hard.
Risks 164, 11 July 2004

Britain
Honda sued by "stressed" employee
Car giant Honda is being sued for loss of earnings by an ex-employee who says she was sick for a year as a result of stress at work.
Risks 163, 3 July 2004

Britain
Get serious on hours, TUC tells ministers
As the government launches a working hours consultation, the TUC has said it should end its "indefensible" support for the long hours culture that is hurting workers and the economy.
Risks 163, 3 July 2004

Australia
Surge in claims for workplace stress
Stressed-out workers in Australia are flooding insurers with claims as a result of low job control, high job demands and poor support from their bosses. Insurers say mental stress accounts for 6 per cent of all injury claims, and the costs per case are considerably higher because victims take more time off work than for other injuries and incur higher medical and legal bills.
Risks 162, 26 June 2004

Britain
TGWU negotiates working time cuts with no loss of pay
Union members at one of the UK's largest haulage companies have backed a deal negotiated by transport union TGWU to reduce working hours in line with the working time directive but with no loss of pay.
Risks 162, 26 June 2004

Britain
Directors have best jobs and lowest stress
Bosses have the least work stress, most job satisfaction and the best health, according to a new study. Senior business directors came bottom of the stress table in all three areas measured by the study - physical health, psychological well-being and job satisfaction.
Risks 160, 12 June 2004

Britain
Pilots working hours campaign takes off
The British public support overwhelmingly airline pilots who say flying hours should be determined not by politicians but by experts or by pilots.
Risks 160, 12 June 2004

Europe
Challenge to finance employers over stress
A union group is to challenge European finance employers to take joint action against growing levels of stress at work. A European - or even global - day of action is under consideration to highlight the stress levels faced by finance staff internationally, says union umbrella group UNI-Europa.
Risks 159, 5 June 2004

Britain
Usdaw starts planning for xmas hols
Shopworkers who fear they will be forced to work on Christmas Day are urging their MPs to show support for the next stage in a campaign to ban big shops opening on this special day.
Risks 158, 29 May 2004

Britain
Stress consultation could bypass safety reps
A three month consultation campaign on proposals to reduce work-related stress has been launched by the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) - but may end up bypassing thousands of safety reps, warns the TUC.
Risks 158, 29 May 2004

Britain
TUC launches search for new bank holiday

The TUC has launched a national search for a new bank holiday as it reveals figures showing that people in Britain get fewer public holidays than any other country in the European Union, even when you include all the new EU member states.
Risks 158, 29 May 2004

Britain
Latest round to the unions in working time fight
Unions have won a major victory in the ongoing fight for an end to the UK opt-out clause from Europe's 48 hour working week ceiling. The European Commission this week warned it was considering proposals to abolish Britain's opt-out.
Risks 157, 22 May 2004

Britain
Long hours undeniably unhealthy for drivers
Retail union Usdaw is warning transport companies not to "bury their heads in the sand" as the introduction of new regulations on maximum working hours draw closer.
Risks 156, 15 May 2004

Britain
Late arriving driver hours law welcomed
The TUC and the Transport and General Workers Union (TGWU) have welcomed the long awaited government announcement of how the Road Transport (Working Time) Directive will be put into practice in the UK.
Risks 154, 1 May 2004

Britain
Company growth can make workers wilt
Working for a company that expands rapidly increases an employee's risk of long-term sickness and hospital admissions, says a report in the Lancet.
Risks 152, 17 April 2004

Britain
Work stress a "material contribution" to stroke
An undercover detective who had to carry out a dangerous bugging operation nine times because of faulty equipment has won the right to substantial damages because of the stress-related ill-health it triggered.
Risks 152, 17 April 2004

USA
Long hours increase injury risks
Limited employee involvement in schedule selection, long work days, and an excess of consecutive work days are all linked to increased risk of ergonomics-related injuries, according to a new report.
Risks 152, 17 April 2004

Japan
Karoshi deaths system speeded up
Work related sudden deaths in Japan have reached a record high, prompting authorities to speed up the official system to recognise cases eligible for compensation.
Risks 151, 10 April 2004

Global
Workers suffer Irritable Desk Syndrome
Cluttered desks, poor posture and hours spent in front of a computer are damaging the health of office staff, with increasing numbers of workers now suffering from "Irritable Desk Syndrome."
Risks 150, 3 April 2004

Britain
Most firms fail to manage stress
Up to five million Britons complain of work-related stress each year, but a new survey shows that most organisations are not following the Health and Safety Executive's soon to be enforced rules to manage and reduce it.
Risks 150, 3 April 2004

Britain
Lords back stressed workers
Law Lords have ruled that employers must take the initiative to protect employees they know are vulnerable to stress-related illness. They awarded a teacher and NUT member Leon Alan Barber £72,547 in damages against his employer, Somerset County Council.
Risks 150, 3 April 2004

Britain
Time to end long hours working
The TUC has called on the European Commission to end the individual opt-out from the Working Time Directive. It says long hours working is bad for the health of long hours workers and ending the opt-out is the only way to stop it.
Risks 150, 3 April 2004

Britain
CBI panic move on working hours out-out
Employers' organisation CBI is pressing ministers to tighten up the UK's working hours rules. The move by CBI - normally the first to cry foul at any attempt at regulation - comes in a bid to head off the TUC's high profile campaign to end the UK opt-out from the 48-hour working week ceiling.
Risks 149, 27 March 2004

Britain
Fury as Royal Mail axes thousands, hammers the rest
Top bosses in Royal Mail want managers to work extra hours, many of them without any extra pay, to offset the staffing shortages that will follow 3,000 "voluntary" redundancies. Amicus, the union representing white collar staff in the firm, reacted angrily to the plan.
Risks 149, 27 March 2004

Britain
Overwork behind another teacher suicide
A teacher who set herself alight had complained about pressure of work, an inquest has been told. Janet Dibb, 28, had been complaining to her father about overwork.
Risks 148, 20 March 2004Hazards guide to the deadly dangers of overwork, including work-related suicide

Britain
Stress yes - compo no, says advisory body
The body that advises ministers on the occupational diseases that should qualify for government industrial injuries payouts has said stress should not be added to the list of "prescribed" industrial diseases, but post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) should be in very limited circumstances.
Risks 148, 20 March 2004

Greece
Unions act on work burn-out dangers
Unions in Greece are calling for action to prevent burn-out at work. Recommendations from the Greek General Confederation of Labour (GSEE) include information provision, work reorganisation and recognition of burn-out as an occupational illness, as well as proper implementation of health and safety regulations.
Risks 147, 13 March 2004

Britain
UK in the dock over work breaks law

The European Commission is taking the UK government to the European Court of Justice for allegedly failing to enforce a directive that entitles employees to breaks at work. It accuses the government of neglecting its working time rules, which unions say has cost staff millions of hours of leisure time.
Risks 147, 13 March 2004

Canada
Corporate "obligation" to tackle stress
Workplace stress and depression are exacting a heavy toll, particularly among conscientious employees "in their prime working years," say a group of Canadian business leaders.
Risks 145, 28 February 2004

Finland
Lack of worktime control makes you sick
Control over your working hours is not just necessary so you run your life, it is essential to your health. A study in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine found a low level of worktime control increases the risk of future health problems.
Risks 145, 28 February 2004

Britain
Overworked? Tell someone about it!
TUC has provided snazzy free eCards for the overworked to send an electronic greeting to friends or colleagues, a print-off-and-stick-up A4 sized poster and a chart of the best long-hours related tunes to whistle while you worked.
Risks 145, 28 February 2004

Australia
Judge blames transport bosses, jails truckie
A truck driver pressured into driving 14-hour shifts has been jailed following a fatal road traffic accident. Sentencing truck driver Joseph Terry Caldwell, 24, to at least three years and 10 months jail time, County court judge Joe Gullaci called for authorities to ban "ruthless" employers who imposed unreasonable deadlines on their drivers.
Risks 144, 21 February 2004

Britain
Which day this year will you start getting paid?
The TUC says "Work your proper hours day" on Friday 27 February 2004, the 42nd working day of the year, is the day in 2004 when on average those who do unpaid overtime stop working for free and start to get paid.
Risks 144, 21 February 2004

Britain
Working parents want family friendly hours
Threequarters of working parents put family friendly working hours ahead of other benefits. A survey by new campaigning charity Working Families found 44 per cent wanted flexible working hours and 30 per cent wanted a shorter working day.
Risks 143, 14 February 2004

Britain
European Parliament challenges UK on long hours
The TUC has welcomed a European Parliament decision to call on the European Commission to end the UK's individual opt-out from the 48-hour average limit on the working week.
Risks 143, 14 February 2004

Britain
Overworked lecturer wins payout
A lecturer who said she often worked 70-hour weeks will receive more than £40,000 in an out-of-court stress settlement. The NATFHE member left her post at Henley College, Coventry, in 1998 after suffering a nervous breakdown - the college had sent her on stress course, but hadn't reduced her workload.
Risks 143, 14 February 2004

Britain
Work your proper hours day, 27 February 2004
If you do regular unpaid overtime, then TUC says on 27 February exercise your right to work only your contractual hours, and remind your boss just how much modern workplaces depend on unpaid overtime.
Risks 142, 7 February 2004

Britain
Long hours culture takes its toll on UK drivers
Excessive hours are having a damaging effect on the family and social lives of most UK lorry drivers, with one in four drivers currently working more than 60 hours per week, according to union research.
Risks 142, 7 February 2004

Britain
Euro union boss urges UK to avoid hours court action
The head of Europe's union umbrella group has urged the government to avoid court proceedings and drop the UK opt-out from the 48-hour working week ceiling.
Risks 142, 7 February 2004

Europe
MEPs support end to working time opt-out
Members of the European Parliament have voted for workplace safety and against Britain's opt-out from the Working Time Directive.
Risks 141, 31 January 2004

Britain
HGV drivers secure milestone hours deal
An agreement between the union Usdaw and A F Blakemore & Son Ltd means lorry drivers are set to maintain their earning levels for working fewer hours. This is one of the first agreements in the country linked to the Road Transport Working Time Directive, due to come into effect in March 2005.
Risks 141, 31 January 2004

Britain
TUC calls "work your proper hours" day
It will be a case of "thank god it's Friday" on 27 February 2004 - the day the TUC has designated the UK's first national "work your proper hours" day.
Risks 141, 31 January 2004

Finland
Sleep deficit comparable to drunkenness
Continuous sleep deficit causes a serious safety risk at the workplace, a sleep expert has warned. Neurologist Markku Partinen said the cheapest preventive occupational safety measure would be good quality sleep.
Risks 140, 24 January 2004

Britain
DTI study shows the need for work hours protection
More than a quarter of employees believe they are spending too long at work, according to the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI).
Risks 139, 17 January 2004

Earlier stories

 


HAZARDS MAGAZINE   •  WORKERS' HEALTH INTERNATIONAL NEWS